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YOU’RE 3 FOCUS BOXES GO HERE

$50

GIFT CARD THAT
CAN BE USED ON
ANY PURCHASE AT EVENT!

30%

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FRAME+LENSES
ORDER*

50%

YOUR SECOND
THIRD, AND
FOURTH PAIRS*

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BUDDY WALK

One gold coin = $5 donated to the buddy walk, which supports individuals with down syndrome.

NATIONWIDE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

One gold coin = One
handmade blanket donated to a child at the hospital who is suffering from disease or illness.

FAQs: SUNGLASSES +
UV RADIATION

Are UV rays harmful for my eyes as well as my skin?

Most people are aware of how harmful UV radiation is to the skin. However, few realize that UV radiation can harm the eyes, and other elements of solar radiation can affect vision.

There are 3 types of UV radiation: UVA, UVB, and UVC. UVA & some UVB rays penetrate the ozone layer and reach the earth's surface, making it necessary to protect your eyes from them. UVC rays are absorbed by the ozone layer and do not present any threat.

Are cheap sunglasses bad for the eyes?

Don't assume that cheap sunglasses provide a high level of protection, even if a sticker on the lenses says "blocks UV." They might not shield your eyes from the sun's harmful UV rays that can cause long-term eye damage and even permanent vision loss. If you do buy an inexpensive pair of glasses, it's a good idea to have them tested by your optometrist.

Are clear lens sunglasses effective?

The tint of the lens has nothing to do with the UV protection of the glasses. A clear lens with no tint and 100% UV protection is better for your eyes than dark, heavily tinted sunglasses without UV protection.

What sunglasses best protect the eyes?

These are the most important factors to consider when purchasing sunglasses for sun protection:

  1. 100% UV protection
  2. Bigger is better. Make sure the whole eye is shielded
  3. Darker lenses don't necessarily offer better protection
  4. Lens color doesn't affect UV protection
  5. Polarized lenses shield glare, but not UV rays
How much UV protection should my sunglasses have?

While some contact lenses provide UV protection, they don't cover your whole eye, so you still need sunglasses. Look for sunglasses that offer 99-100% of both UVA and UVB protection. This includes those labeled "UV 400," which blocks all light rays with wavelengths up to 400 nanometers.

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Eye Care Services in Johnstown and Westerville, Ohio
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Children's Vision

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Comprehensive Eye Exams

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Dry Eye Center

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Contact Lens Services

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Eye Health

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Emergency Eye Care Services

Dr.-Burns1

Dr. Carole R. Burns (FCOVD)

Dr. Burns graduated from The Ohio State University College of Optometry in 1984. She completed her vision therapy and pediatric residency at The State University of New York in 1985. She is an assistant clinical professor at The Ohio State University College of Optometry. She is a member of the Central Ohio Optometric Association, the Ohio Optometric Association, the American Optometric Association, The AOA Sports Vision Section, and is a Certified Fellow of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development.

Dr. Burns represents all of Ohio’s optometrists as a member of the Council on Health Information. This organization represents all medical professionals with the goal of improving health care to all people living in Ohio.

She is known for the work with children’s vision and patients who have special needs. She is a speaker for the Vision Council of Americaand lectures nationally on the topics of pediatric vision, binocular vision disorders, sports vision, and learning-related vision disorders.

Patient Reviews
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Serving Patients From:

Lewis Center | Westerville | Johnstown | Northeast Columbus | and the state of Ohio