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The Importance of Eye Exams for Contact Lenses

Are you planning on wearing contact lenses for the first time? Do you need a new contact lens prescription? Are your current contacts not as comfortable as you wish they were? Your eye doctor will perform a contact lens eye exam to ensure that your vision with contacts is clear, comfortable, and safe, providing you with the right lenses for you. 

What is a contact lens exam?

If you wear or want to wear contact lenses, you’ll need an eye exam for contact lenses, in addition to your regular comprehensive eye exam. Special tests are performed during a contact lens exam to evaluate your eyes and vision with contacts. 

Are eyeglass prescriptions the same as contact lens prescriptions?

No, a prescription for glasses cannot be used for contact lenses. An eyeglass prescription is for lenses that are positioned approximately 12 millimeters from your eyes, whereas a contact lens prescription is measured for lenses that sit directly on the surface of your eye.

The prescription for contact lenses also includes the brand, lens diameter and curvature, which are not part of an eyeglass prescription.

Contact lenses fitting: One size does not fit all

One contact lens size doesn’t fit all eyes. If a contact lens is too flat or too steep for your corneal shape, you may experience discomfort or even eye damage. Your eye doctor will take certain measurements to determine the best contact lens design and fit for your eyes. 

Corneal curvature

This measures the curvature of your eye’s clear front surface (cornea) so the eye doctor can select the optimal curve and diameter for your contact lenses. If your eye’s surface is somewhat irregular because of astigmatism or other conditions, you may require a special lens. 

Pupil and iris size

The size of your pupil and iris (the colored part of your eye) is also important in determining the best contact lens design.

Tear film evaluation

This test evaluates the quality of your tears, to determine whether they will be able to keep contact lenses and your cornea sufficiently hydrated throughout the day. If you have dry eye disease, standard contact lenses may not be right for you. 

Trial lenses

Following the eye exam, you will be provided with trial lenses to verify that the chosen contact lenses offer clear and comfortable vision. This will allow the eye doctor to make any fine adjustments to the prescription.

Contact Lens Eye Exam Near You

Wearing the correct contact lenses for your eyes allows you to enjoy all of the benefits of wearing contacts, while keeping your eyes healthy and comfortable. 

If you’re already a contact lens wearer, visit your eye doctor at least once a year to make sure the lenses are still providing you with optimum vision and comfort.

Contact Professional VisionCare in Lewis Center to book your contact lens eye exam today!

Why Does Your Eye Doctor Dilate Your Pupils for an Eye Exam?

If you’ve been following the guideline to have regular eye exams, then you’re probably familiar with having your pupils dilated. Why does your eye doctor do this?

By dilating your pupils, the eye doctor can get a better view of your inner eye structures – so the eye exam is more comprehensive and more detailed. While the back of your eye can be seen through an undilated pupil, it cannot be examined as fully.

A full evaluation of your macula, retina and optic nerve is possible through dilated pupils. In many common eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma, these are the parts of the eye that exhibit signs of a problem. Also, health conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes can often be detected on these parts of the eye.

What happens when the eye doctor dilates your pupils?

Your eye doctor or a technician will insert eye drops into your eyes; it takes 20 – 30 minutes for them to take full effect. Then, your eye doctor will use a lighted microscope to inspect your eyes.

Initially, you may feel a slight stinging when the drops are first inserted, but the discomfort is typically minor and short-lived. For a few hours afterwards, your eyes will be extra-sensitive to light and vision may be slightly blurred. Wearing sunglasses can help manage this sensitivity. Dilation usually wears off within four to six hours.

Even though getting your pupils dilated for an eye exam may feel like a nuisance, it enables your eye doctor to check your ocular health and overall body health with much more accuracy. So the benefits are clear! Contact an expert eye doctor near you to schedule an eye exam.

At Professional VisionCare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 614-898-9989 or book an appointment online to see one of our Lewis Center eye doctors.

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Your Eyes Are the Windows to Your Health

Your eyes aren’t just the windows to your soul — they can also reveal valuable information about your general health beyond whether you need glasses, including: diabetes, heart disease, and even cancer. It is not unusual for people to come in for an eye exam just to check their eyesight and then have certain health issues or predispositions picked up by the optometrist. 

Eye Exams and Your Health

Eye examinations can help doctors detect general health conditions early enough to intervene. Advanced screenings enable eye doctors to better predict cardiovascular incidents like stroke, and possibly detect signs of mental changes such as Alzheimer’s. Read below to learn how eye exams can unveil a whole lot more than just eye health.

Brain Cancer & Stroke

Because of the similarities between the blood vessels in the eye and brain, an eye doctor can occasionally detect an issue taking place in the brain by examining the blood vessels in the eyes. If swelling or shadows in the eye is observed, it may indicate a serious condition in the brain, like a tumor, or clots that might result in a stroke.

Diabetes

Diabetes can cause damage to the blood vessels in the retina at the back of the eye, resulting in Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) and Diabetic Macular Edema (DME). If an optometrist detects leaky blood vessels in the eye, the patient would be advised to see a doctor to help control their blood sugar. Changes are gradual, and they start before visual symptoms are noticed. The earlier diabetic eye disease is managed, the better the chances are of preserving eyesight. 

Hypertension

High blood pressure, characterized by having too much pressure in the blood vessels, can be detected during an eye exam, sometimes even before it’s diagnosed by your regular doctor. The damaged blood vessels lead to swelling, hemorrhages, and leaking — all of which can be observed in the eyes. According to the CDC, hypertension “the silent killer” affects nearly 1 in 3 adults, and up to a whopping 20% of those don’t even know they have it. So early detection at an eye doctor’s evaluation can be truly life-saving.

High Cholesterol 

Eye exams can also detect a buildup of cholesterol. High cholesterol is among the easiest conditions to spot during a complete eye exam, as the cholesterol deposits manifest on the front of the eye, appearing as a thin, gray rim around the cornea. It can also be detected in the retina by assessing artery and vein patterns.

These deposits may indicate the current or future development of Retinal Blood Vessel Occlusion, a condition where blockages restrict blood flow to the back of the eye, causing temporary or permanent vision loss. 

Heart Conditions

In some cases, heart conditions associated with a buildup of plaque in the carotid artery in the heart can also lead to deposits that clog the ocular arteries in the eye. If an optometrist detects such changes to the vascular structure at the back of the eye, he or she will typically recommend going to a specialist.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Sudden vision loss may be attributed to Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While the optometrist can recognize signs indicating the presence of MS, such as the color and appearance of the optic nerve, such cases will be referred for further testing to confirm the diagnosis.

Thyroid

Thyroid disease can make itself apparent through the eyes in several ways. The thyroid gland controls the hormones that regulate tear production so some thyroid disorders can cause dry eye disease. Additionally, overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) can make the extraocular muscles enlarge and stiffen, causing bulging eyes — an indicator of Graves’ disease. 

Inflammation

Systemic conditions that are associated with inflammation in the body can have an inflammatory effect on the eyes. Uveitis, for example, causes eye inflammation, redness, and blurred vision, and tends to occur in people with lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune diseases. 

Cancer

Breast cancer, leukemia, and other metastatic cancers are occasionally discovered during an eye evaluation. In addition to brain cancer mentioned above, melanoma and basal cell carcinoma (skin cancer) can be detected, and eye doctors can also diagnose lymphoma and other eye tumors. Eye exams save lives.

What the Future Holds 

Alzheimer’s 

Recent studies show that a non-invasive and precise imaging device called Octa (optical coherence tomography angiography) can signal the presence of eye changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Because the retina is in many ways an extension of the brain, the altered blood vessels at the back of the eye offer a glimpse into the changes taking place within the brain.

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s Disease can often be misdiagnosed as its early symptoms are characteristic of other conditions. Research has shown that subtle eye tremors, an early Parkinson’s marker, could be detectable using advanced eye exam technology. One day soon, practitioners may send patients to an eye doctor to test for this and other diseases.

Your Eye Doctor’s Appointment Could Change Your Life

So the next time you visit Dr. Carole Burns at Professional VisionCare in Lewis Center, remember that a comprehensive eye exam can do more than determine your eyeglasses or contacts prescription. Dr. Carole Burns can evaluate your eyes for existing or potential health issues, and communicate them to your primary care physician for the best possible care. By knowing that you’re at risk for a certain disease, you can take precautions early on and manage the condition as needed. After all, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

How much digital screen time is OK for kids?

Tips for avoiding computer vision syndrome

Kids and their smartphones go hand in hand, rarely to be separated nowadays. It’s typical to find children of all ages hiding under their covers at night with Alto’s Adventure, or texting instead of studying for tomorrow’s test. Ever wonder what all this digital screen time is doing to their vision? While totally banishing all screen time from your child’s day is unrealistic, eye care professionals recommend setting limits to keep eyes healthy. How much screen time is advised?

Our kids’ eye care specialists in Lewis Center, Ohio, explain about the hazards of spending too many minutes each day gazing at a digital screen, and how it can lead to computer vision syndrome.

Why is it unhealthy to look at digital screens?

Blue light is emitted by the digital screens of computers and all mobile devices. Over time, this type of shorter-wavelength, higher-energy visible light may be dangerous for your retina. Blue light has been linked to the development of certain eye diseases in the future, such as cataracts and macular degeneration.

Blue light is also emitted by the sun and is integral for regulating your body’s sleep-wake cycle. However, by adding hours of daily blue light exposure from digital tech (especially at the wrong times of day – such as late at night), it can disrupt a person’s normal rhythms. For kids, the resulting daytime drowsiness can lead to poor school performance, and an unregulated sleep schedule can lead to weight gain and health problems associated with obesity. Also, research has shown that people who don’t have a healthy pattern of activity and sleep are more likely to suffer from depression, lower levels of happiness, feelings of loneliness, and overall mood disorders.

Teens who spend excessive amounts of time using digital screens have also been found to be at a higher risk of developing symptoms of ADHD, according to a scientific study conducted in Los Angeles high schools.

How much time does your child spend using digital screens?

According to statistics compiled by Common Sense Media (a nonprofit dedicated to promoting safe technology and media for kids), the average young child in the U.S. spends the following amount of time using digital gadgets each day:

  • Children under 2 years old: 42 minutes
  • Children between 2 to 4 years old: 2.5 hours
  • Children between 5 to 8 years old: almost 3 hours

What problems can be caused by too much digital screen time?

These daily amounts are associated with a rise in kids experiencing the painful symptoms of computer vision syndrome. According to the Vision Council, 30% of parents attest that their kids suffer from the following symptoms:

  • Neck/shoulder pain
  • Headaches,
  • Dry or irritated eyes
  • Reduced attention span
  • Behavioral problems
  • Irritability

In addition to the discomfort of the above symptoms, all of them can also have a significant effect on your child’s social interactions and academic development.

Additionally, the progression of nearsightedness (myopia) has also been associated with computer vision syndrome and overexposure to electronic screens. Unbelievably, approximately half of all young adults are now nearsighted, in contrast to only 25% in the 1970s!

What’s the best way to prevent computer vision syndrome?

Limiting digital screen time for kids is an effective way to minimize blue light exposure, the risks of computer vision syndrome, and our child’s chances of developing eye health problems in the future. Institute a “no-screens” rule in your home that begins about an hour or two before bedtime. Or enforce a time limit on your child’s phone use; many time management apps are available to help with this mission.

If your kid wears prescription glasses, another effective way to block blue light is by purchasing eyeglasses with blue-light protection from our Lewis Center, Ohio, kids’ eye care collection. Several lens manufacturers produce lenses for glasses that filter out blue light. An anti-reflective blue light-blocking coating can also be applied to lenses.

If your child doesn’t need prescription eyewear, then we recommend investing in a protective blue light filter to apply to the surface of all digital screens. Many options are available, in addition to various blue-light filtering apps that you can download.

Book annual kids’ eye exams to keep watch on eye health and vision

Regular kids’ eye exams are the most dependable way to monitor your child’s ocular condition for any signs of a problem. During your appointment at Professional VisionCare, be sure to ask us for more information about the many ways to keep your child’s eyes safe from blue light.


At Professional VisionCare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 614-898-9989 or book an appointment online to see one of our Lewis Center eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

FOLLOW US:

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