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Back-To-School: Why [Eye_Exams] Are More Important Than Ever

Since the onset of COVID-19, many children have been learning remotely through distance learning programs. While parents are concerned about their children falling behind academically, eye doctors are concerned that undiagnosed vision problems may impact the child’s school performance.

Undetected vision problems may hinder a child’s ability to learn. That’s why eye doctors strongly recommend that children undergo a thorough eye exam before the new school year begins.

While it’s tempting to rely on vision screenings provided by schools, these superficial visual acuity tests can identify only a limited number of eyesight problems. Only a comprehensive eye exam conducted by an eye doctor can accurately diagnose and address a wide range of problems related to vision and eye health.

Why Are Eye Exams Important?

Up to 80% of children’s learning is visual, so even the slightest vision problem can have a negative impact on their academic achievement. Taking a child in for an eye exam once a year will allow your eye doctor to detect and correct refractive errors like myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) and astigmatism, and check their visual skills, such as convergence insufficiency, binocular vision, focusing and more.

Comprehensive eye exams are the best way to detect mild and serious eye health conditions. Routine eye exams are especially important for children with a family history of eye health problems.

How Is Vision Affected By Online Learning?

The amount of time children spend looking at digital screens was already a concern in the pre-pandemic era—but the COVID pandemic has only exacerbated the issue. According to the Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, children spent twice as much time on screens during COVID-related closures than they did prior to the pandemic.

For one thing, spending prolonged periods of time on digital devices forces the eyes to work harder, making children (and adults) more susceptible to digital eye strain, one of the hallmark symptoms of computer vision syndrome. People who spend 2 or more consecutive hours staring at a screen are at higher risk of developing this condition.

Some computer vision syndrome symptoms include:

  • Blurred vision
  • Dry eyes
  • Eye fatigue
  • Eye pain
  • Headaches
  • Neck and shoulder pain

These symptoms can be caused by a combination of the following factors:

  • Glare and reflections from the screen
  • Excessive time looking at a screen
  • Poor lighting
  • Poor posture
  • Screen brightness
  • Undetected vision problems

In addition to digital eye strain, several studies have found that children who spend many hours indoors doing “near work” — writing, reading and looking at computers and other digital devices — have a higher rate of myopia progression.

A study published in the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s professional journal, Ophthalmology, found that first-graders who spent at least 11 hours per week playing outside in the sunshine experienced slower myopia progression. Some researchers think that exposure to sunlight and looking at distant objects while playing outdoors might help decrease myopia progression.

While regular eye exams are essential for every member of the family, they’re especially important for those who spend a good portion of their day in front of a screen.

Don’t put off your child’s annual eye exam. Schedule an appointment with Professional VisionCare in Lewis Center today!

Q&A

1. At what age should a child have an eye exam?

According to the American and Canadian Optometric Associations, it’s recommended for a child to have their first eye exam between 6-12 months of age.

Before a child starts school, they should undergo an eye exam, and every one to two years after that, based on their eye doctor‘s recommendation.

2. Does my child need an eye exam if they passed the school vision screening?

Yes! School vision screenings are superficial eye evaluations designed to diagnose a limited number of vision problems like myopia. They do not check for visual skills and other problems that may hinder your child’s academic success.

Your eye doctor will evaluate your child’s vision and eye health, along with visual abilities, including depth perception and eye tracking, to let you know whether your child’s eyes are “school-ready.”

Does Your Child Really Have Vision Issues?

Pediatric Eye Exam in Lewis Center

Pediatric Eye Exam in Lewis Center

Most kids don’t suspect that something is wrong with their eyesight and are thus unlikely to seek help with their vision. If you witness your child tilting his or her head too often, frequently squinting, or holding books or other objects unusually close or far away from his or her eyes, it may be time for an eye exam.

Book an appointment with Dr. Carole Burns at Professional VisionCare today. We will provide a comprehensive eye exam that will detect whether your child has any vision aberrations.

It’s up to parents to recognize the signs of compromised eyesight and to take the necessary precautions against it. Read on to learn the basics of keeping your children’s vision sharp and healthy.

Why Are Vision Screenings Not Enough?

School or pediatric vision screenings often offer superficial eye exams that cannot detect underlying vision issues that get in the way of your child’s success in school and life. In fact, it is estimated that up to 10 million kids suffer from vision issues, despite having passed a school vision screening. Therefore, it is critical to have your child’s eyes examined by an eye doctor in order to assess their overall eye health. The earlier they do it, the better.

Does Your Child Really Hate to Read?

If your child dislikes or avoids reading, it might indicate a vision problem.

Does your child…

  • Use a finger or pencil to guide the eyes while reading?
  • Incessantly rub his or her eyes?
  • Cover one eye while reading?
  • Frequently tilt his or her head?

Reading with undiagnosed vision problems can result in headaches, fatigue and eye strain, which could explain why your child shies away from engaging in this activity.

Should your child need glasses for vision correction, Professional VisionCare has a wide variety of age-appropriate options, made of comfortable, durable, and kid-friendly materials.

Should Eye Exams be on the Back-to-School To-Do List?

By the age of 6, every child should have undergone three eye exams. Make sure to prioritize eye exams by adding it to the back-to-school to-do list. No matter how wonderful the pencils and markers are, if the vision isn’t there, your child will struggle through school, sports, and in life.

Is it Clumsiness or a Vision Problem?

If your child frequently bumps into desks, knocks things over, and trips, it may not be just clumsiness. Contact Professional VisionCare for an eye exam today.

Spending Too Much Time on Computer/Digital Screens?

Too Much Screen Time is Linked To Myopia

The use of digital devices is on the rise, and so is myopia (nearsightedness).

Research has shown that prolonged use of computers and digital devices among children can result in myopia. Focusing on images or words on the screen for extended periods of time can result in eye strain, and over time, can even change the shape of a child’s eye. As a parent, we recommend you limit your child’s computer or phone screen time and incorporate the 20/20/20 rule (every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds).

Blue Light Blocking Glasses or Lenses for Digital Screens

Another problem with using digital devices has to do with the blue light these devices emit. Smartphones expose us to the most blue light, since we hold them very close to our eyes. Long hours of blue light exposure can harm the eyes and disrupt sleep quality.

However, the harm caused by blue light can be reduced by wearing special Blue Light lenses.

At Professional VisionCare, we offer blue light filters for lenses, which block blue light from reaching one’s eyes and protect your vision when using digital devices. Ask us about adding blue-light filters to your or your child’s glasses, or about getting a full pair of blue light eyeglasses.

Why Opt for Polycarbonate Lenses?

When it comes to kids, the lenses you pick a matter. Professional VisionCare recommends opting for polycarbonate lenses when buying glasses. They are more lightweight, impact-resistant and scratch-resistant than traditional plastic lenses. Furthermore, the UV protection can protect your child’s eyes from the sun’s harmful rays.

If you want your kids to ace their classes this year, remember to prioritize a visit to the eye doctor as part of your back-to-school checklist.

Prepare for Back to School with Blue Light Glasses | Professional VisionCare



Comprehensive Pediatric Eye Exams

At Professional VisionCare, we offer comprehensive pediatric eye exams, as well as a wide array of glasses and lenses for our young patients. Professional VisionCare serves patients from in and around Lewis Center in the state of Ohio.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: My child saw 20/20 at their school physical. That’s perfect vision for back to school, right?

  • A: Maybe! 20/20 only tells us what size letter can be seen 20 feet away. People with significant farsightedness or eye muscle imbalances may see 20/20, but experience enough visual strain to make reading difficult. Vision controls eighty percent of learning so include a thorough eye exam in your child’s Back-to-School list.

Q: My child passed the screening test at school, isn’t that enough?

  • A: Distance and reading are two different things. Someone with perfect distance vision can still have focusing problems up close. Doctors need to check for both, many children have undiagnosed accommodative (focusing) problems because no one ever looked for it before. We always check the distance and near vision on all ages because it is so important. Other areas that need to be checked is eye muscle alignment, color vision, depth perception, and overall health of the eyes.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Professional VisionCare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


Childhood Myopia Is in Crisis Mode on a Global Scale

When it comes to the prevalence of myopia (nearsightedness), the statistics are staggering. By 2050, nearly half of the world’s population—about 5 billion people—will be myopic. Below are a few useful tips to help you prevent your child from being part of that statistic.

What Is Myopia?

Myopia occurs when the eye elongates, causing light rays to focus in front of the light-sensitive retina rather than directly on it, while looking at something far away. So, people with nearsightedness perceive distant objects as blurred while close-up objects can remain clear.

Myopia tends to develop during childhood, when the eyeballs rapidly grow (along with the rest of the body), mainly between the ages of 8-18. It can worsen slowly or quickly, but it is not simply an inconvenience. People with progressive myopia are more likely to develop serious eye diseases like cataracts, retinal detachment, macular degeneration and glaucoma later in life—conditions which may lead to permanent loss of vision and even blindness.

How To Know Whether Your Child Is Myopic

Below are some telltale signs to watch for:

  • Blurred distance vision – Objects in the distance are blurred; kids may complain that they can’t see the board
  • Headaches – When myopia isn’t corrected, it can cause eye strain and headaches.
  • Head tilting or squinting – If your child squints or tilts his or her head while watching TV, for example, it may be a symptom of myopia.
  • Looking at objects too closely – If you notice your child moving closer to the TV or squinting as they try to see the writing on the board, it may indicate myopia.

What Parents Can Do to Slow Their Child’s Myopia Progression

  • Encourage your child to go outdoors for at least 90 minutes a day, preferably in the sunshine. Studies show that playing outdoors reduces the risk of developing myopia and slows its progression.
  • Limit the amount of time your child spends staring at a screen, reading and doing close work such as homework.
  • When your child uses a digital screen, make sure that it isn’t too close to the face.
  • Teach the 20-20-20 rule: During screen time, take a break every 20 minutes to look at an object across the room or out the window about 20 feet away, for at least 20 seconds.
Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Carole R. Burns (FCOVD)

Q: How is myopia diagnosed?

  • A: Your child’s eye doctor will perform a thorough pediatric eye exam to diagnose myopia, which often includes a visual acuity test, where the eye doctor will use an eye chart made up of letters of varied sizes. If the test results indicate myopia, then the optometrist may shine a light into their eyes and evaluate the reflection off the retina to determine the degree of refractive error for their prescription.

Q: Can myopia lead to blindness?

  • A: High myopia may increase your child’s risk of developing more serious eye conditions later in life, such as cataracts, retinal detachment and glaucoma. Left untreated, high myopia complications can sometimes lead to blindness—which is why routine eye exams are critical.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Lewis Center, Ohio. Visit Professional VisionCare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

What Is a Pinguecula?

Although you’ve probably never heard of a pinguecula, it is actually more common than you might think.

A pinguecula is a pale yellowish and benign growth on the eye’s conjunctiva (the thin, transparent membrane covering the outer surface of the eye). Pingueculae tend to be triangular or round in shape and are slightly raised. If they protrude too much, they can cause eye irritation, redness, and other symptoms.

If you suspect you have a pinguecula, Professional VisionCare in Lewis Center can help.

What Can Cause a Pinguecula?

Not all causes of these growths have been determined, but we know that overexposure to sunlight, wind, and other harsh elements contributes to their formation. These factors have been linked to changes in the conjunctiva, and cause the deposit of either fat, calcium, or protein to form a pinguecula.

In fact, people who live near the equator are more likely to develop pingueculae than those who don’t, due to the sun’s powerful rays in those areas of the globe.

Pingueculae are also more common in older people.

What Are Common Symptoms?

A person with a pinguecula may experience any of the following symptoms, usually only in the affected eye:

  • Dry eyes
  • Gritty eyes
  • Red eyes
  • Itchy or burning eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • Swollen eyes

Do They Require Treatment?

In most cases, a pinguecula develops with age and doesn’t require any treatment.

However, if your pinguecula is causing you trouble, it may be time to visit your eye doctor. Your eye doctor will prescribe eye drops or ointments to help soothe your eyes and relieve the redness and swelling.

In severe cases, the pinguecula may need to be surgically removed, but know that it could grow back after surgery.

We Are Here for All Your Eye Care Needs

If you have a pinguecula, it’s important to have regular eye exams to ensure that the growth isn’t interfering with your vision and eye health.

At Professional VisionCare in Lewis Center, we offer a wide range of eye care services to keep your eyes feeling and looking great. To schedule your next comprehensive eye exam, call us today!

At Professional VisionCare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 614-898-9989 or book an appointment online to see one of our Lewis Center eye doctors.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Amy R. Lay

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Lewis Center, Ohio. Visit Professional VisionCare for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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Safeguard Your Child’s Eyes with Sports Glasses

43 percent of all sports-related eye injuries occur in children 15 and under. Eye injuries are a leading cause of blindness and visual impairment among children in the United States alone. Luckily, 9 out of 10 sports-related eye injuries can be prevented with the right protective eyewear.

What Is Protective Eyewear?

Protective eyewear is eyewear made of ultra-strong polycarbonate, a type of plastic that is impact resistant, which means it can take a hit and not break. They are also a more flexible material and protects eyes from ultraviolet (UV) rays. Types of protective eyewear for sports include safety goggles, face guards, and special eyewear designed for specific sports.

Most protective eyewear can utilize a child’s prescription, although protective eyewear is vital even for children with perfect vision. Safety goggles can usually be worn over a child’s regular glasses or contacts.

Different sports require different kinds of protective eyewear.

  • For high-risk sports like baseball or softball, soccer, football, tennis, hockey, volleyball, or basketball, one-piece plastic sports frames with prescription or nonprescription polycarbonate lenses allow for clear vision and protection.
  • For lower-risk sports like cycling or skating, look for strong eyeglass frames with polycarbonate lenses.

The Importance of Protective Eyewear In Sports

The main reason being, to protect your eyes from injuries. Injuries may include getting hit in the eye, getting jabbed or poked, or a flying object in the eye.

While children – and adults wear protective eyewear first and foremost to protect their eyes, doing so can also help your child have better all-around vision while playing sports. With protective eyewear, they can focus on the game and not be worried about getting something in their eye, or breaking or losing their regular frames or contact lenses. Sport goggles allow their peripheral vision to be clear and can help increase their hand and eye coordination.

Start protecting your child’s eye from sports-related eye injuries and give them better vision while playing, by contacting Professional VisionCare today!

At Professional VisionCare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 614-898-9989 or book an appointment online to see one of our Lewis Center eye doct

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Are Contact Lenses Safe For Young Children?

Here’s a question we often get at our practice: ‘Is my child too young for contact lenses?’ This is an important question, and the answer may surprise you.

For children with myopia (nearsightedness), contact lenses can be a convenient method of vision correction. It allows kids to go about their day without having to worry about breaking or misplacing their glasses, and enables them to freely participate in sports and other physical activities.

Some children and young teens may ask their parents for contact lenses because they feel self-conscious wearing glasses. Contact lenses may even provide children with the confidence boost they need to come out of their shell. Moreover, these days, it is very popular for children to wear single-use one-day disposable soft contacts, since there is no cleaning or maintenance involved.

Some parents may deny their child’s request for contacts due to concerns about eye health and safety. There’s no reason to worry: contact lenses are just as safe for children as they are for anyone else.

At Professional VisionCare, we provide children, teens, and patients of all ages with a wide variety of contact lenses. If you’re concerned about the safety of contacts for your child, we’ll be happy to explain and explore ways to ensure maximum safety, optimal eye health and comfort. To learn more or to schedule a pediatric eye exam for contact lenses, contact us today.

What Are the Risks of Having My Child Wear Contact Lenses?

A study published in the January 2021 issue of The Journal of Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics found that kids aren’t at a higher risk of experiencing contact lens complications.

The study followed nearly 1000 children aged 8-16 over the course of 1.5-3 years to determine how contact lenses affected their eye health.

The results indicate that age doesn’t have an effect on contact lens safety. In fact, the researchers found that the risk of developing infections or other adverse reactions was less than 1% per year of wear — which is comparable to contact lens wearers of other ages.

But before you decide that contact lenses are right for your child, you may want to consider whether your child is ready to wear them. During his or her eye doctor’s appointment, the optometrist may ask about your child’s level of maturity, responsibility, and personal hygiene. Since many children are highly motivated to wear contacts, they tend to display real maturity in caring for their lenses. That said, in the initial stages, parents may need to play an active role, as their child gets used to inserting and removing the new contact lenses.

It’s important to note that just as with any other medical device, contact lenses are not risk-free. Anyone who wears contact lenses has a chance of developing eye infections or other complications with contact lenses. However, when worn and cared for according to your eye doctor’s instructions, contact lenses are low-risk and perfectly safe for children and teenagers.

So, go ahead and bring your child in for a contact lens consultation! We’ll help determine if your child is ready for contacts and answer any questions you or your child may have. To schedule your child’s contact lens fitting or eye exam, contact Professional VisionCare in Lewis Center today.

How Can I Tell If My Child Needs Glasses?

Our Eye Doctors Share 6 Warning Signs

Every parent wants their child to make the most of his or her potential – both in and out of school. That doesn’t always mean you need to hire extra tutors and enroll your kid in daily after-school enrichment courses. In fact, one of the most effective ways to help children maximize their abilities is much less time-consuming and less costly. So what’s this secret method for helping kids to excel?… Schedule a pediatric eye exam to see if they need glasses!

Optimal vision is required to develop basic learning and socializing skills, such as reading, writing and forming new friendships. As you make a list of all the essentials your child needs for school, remember to include “eye exam”. Fortunately, it’s easy to cross that task off the list with a visit to our friendly St. Louis and St. Charles eye doctors.

While only a thorough eye exam by our optometrist can diagnose if your child needs (or doesn’tneed) eyeglasses, there are telltale warnings signs for parents to be aware of. The following 6 signs may point to your child’s need to wear prescription eyeglasses:

1. Squinting

This can indicate the presence of a refractive error, which affects the eyes ability to focus on an image. Squinting can temporarily bring objects into focus.

2. Head tilting or covering one eye

By angling his head or covering one eye, your child may be able to enhance the clarity of an object or to eliminate double vision. This trick works best when eyes are misaligned, or when your child has the common condition of a lazy eye (amblyopia).

3. Holding digital devices close to the eyes or sitting close to the screen

If your kid always sits right next to the TV screen or brings handheld devices up to her nose to see them, it may be a sign of nearsightedness.

4. Eye rubbing

Eyestrain or fatigue may lead to excessive eye rubbing. This can be a red flag for a variety of vision conditions, including eye allergies.

5. Headaches and/or eye pain

If your child goes to bed each night complaining about a headache, it could indicate that he spent the day overexerting his eyes to see clearly.

6. Trouble concentrating and/or weak reading comprehension

When learning in a classroom, kids need to constantly adapt their visual focus from near to far and back again. They are always shifting their eyes between the board, computer, notebook and textbook. If their eye teaming or focusing skills (accommodation) aren’t up to par, they won’t be able to maintain the necessary concentration.

Problems in school are often misdiagnosed as ADD or ADHD, when poor vision is really to blame. Think about it- if your child cannot see the board crisp and clear, her mind will likely wander to more interesting things. This will make it very hard for her to keep up in class and very easy to fall behind.

To protect your child from a medical misdiagnosis or being labeled with a behavioral problem, we encourage you to reserve an eye exam in our , and optometry offices. It’s very possible that a precise vision prescription and a pair of designer eyeglasses is all the treatment your child needs!

At Professional VisionCare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 614-898-9989 or book an appointment online to see one of our Lewis Center eye doctors.

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Fun Home-Based Activities to Strengthen Your Child’s Vision

crayons coloringAlthough 20/20 clarity is important, it’s not enough. You see, the visual system is made up of the eyes and the brain — and it’s how these two parts work together that makes all the difference. When your eyes and brain don’t communicate with each other properly, you may experience decreased reading comprehension, disorientation, lack of focus, and decreased cognitive abilities.

Strong visual skills are essential for learning and performing well in school and in sports. These include:

  • Fixation: The ability to fixate or hold your gaze on a target for an extended period.
  • Pursuit: The ability to follow a moving target as you would follow a tennis ball.
  • Saccade: The ability to rapidly shift focus between targets, such as moving from word to word while reading.
  • Accommodation: The ability to shift focus between distant to near objects (and vice versa), such as looking at the board and then writing notes in your notebook.
  • Binocularity: Using both eyes simultaneously.

If any of the above vision skills are deficient, your child may have difficulty paying attention, experience fatigue, exhibit behavioral problems, rub their eyes while reading, or use their finger to follow each word in a text. Furthermore, your child may appear to be performing well below their potential, and their writing may be messy despite having good fine motor skills. If your child has been diagnosed with reduced visual skills, why not continue to develop these skills at home? There are several activities that parents and caretakers can do during this time to help kids improve their vision.

At-Home Vision Exercises

Below are some ways you can help kids develop healthy vision from the comfort of their home.

Reading, Mazes, Puzzles and Writing — tracking

Visual tracking is made up of two skills: moving your eyes between targets (also called “saccades”), and following moving targets (called “pursuits”). We all make use of these basic skills every time we read, write, draw, drive, or do sports. Problems with tracking are manifested when we frequently lose our place while reading, or skim over words without processing them. Increasing the amount of time your child assembles puzzles, draws, and reads will improve their visual tracking.

Focusing on Static Targets — focus and depth perception

Focusing problems refer to the inability to sustain focus on a single point, or to easily switch between two targets (near and far, for example). One exercise is to hold a crayon or pen in front of your child and have them focus on it. Slowly move the pen closer to their eyes, and then away again. This develops focus and depth perception.

Alphabet Ball — fixation, binocularity, pursuits

With a permanent marker, draw letters, animals or colors on a ball or balloon. As you roll or toss the ball/balloon, ask your child to call out the last thing they noticed before catching it.

Near-Far Tasks — accommodation

Children are often required to alternate between near and far objects, such as when looking at their notebook and then at the blackboard, and back again. Have your child sit at a table and draw the shapes you have sketched on a piece of paper and hung on a nearby wall. The motion of looking from a near point to far point will help improve accommodation skills.

Pencil Movement — fixation

Ask your child to find a colored crayon they plan to use for drawing. But before they begin drawing, slowly move it in figure 8’s — horizontal, vertical, and circular motions in front of them — while having them follow it with their eyes. Doing this 5 minutes a day is an excellent way to improve fixation.

From all of us at Vision Therapy Center At Professional Vision Care, we wish you and your family a safe and healthy few months ahead.

Vision Therapy Center At Professional Vision Care serves patients from Lewis Center, Westerville, Johnstown, Northeast Columbus, and throughout Ohio.

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Contact Lenses for Children

Do kids and contact lenses make good partners?

Many parents question whether children are good candidates for wearing contact lenses safely. In general, yes – many kids can successfully and safely wear contacts! However, this depends heavily on the individual child’s personality and maturity level, and not necessarily on their age (as many people believe).

At Professional VisionCare, we perform thorough eye exams for children in our modern eye care offices in Lewis Center, Westerville, Johnstown, and , Ohio. Based on the results from your child’s eye exam and a personalized consultation, we’ll help determine their candidacy for contacts. What issues must be taken into consideration?

When are kids ready to start wearing contact lenses?

Often, children as young as eight years old can wear contacts – but older teens cannot. That’s because readiness has to do with the child’s level of responsibility. To figure out if your kid is responsible enough to take care of contact lenses, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Will he or she follow our eye doctor’s instructions for how to take care of contact lenses?
  • Will he or she remember to remove the contacts before falling asleep each night?
  • Will your child be able to keep track of when to switch to a fresh pair of lenses?
  • Does your child finish chores and homework without constant reminders?

What’s the best type of contact lenses for kids?

Our optometrists in Lewis Center, Westerville, Johnstown, and , Ohio, often recommend daily disposable soft contacts for children of all ages. Caring for these lenses couldn’t be any easier – all your kid needs to do is throw them out each night and insert a fresh pair in the morning. For the health of your child’s eyes, it’s critical to choose high-quality dailies from a premium, brand-name manufacturer. Cheaper versions, such as knock-off labels from online shops, are associated with a much higher incidence of eye injury and infection!

How can kids benefit from contact lenses?

If your child plays sports, this is a simple question to answer! Glasses, even the best polycarbonate frames and lenses, can crack and cause eye injury. Putting on a pair of safety goggles over contact lenses is a much safer solution. As an added bonus, this vision combo gives wider peripheral vision than eyeglasses for seeing the whole field or court.

All kids, athletes and bookworms, get a boost to their self-esteem if they’re insecure about their appearance in glasses. Studies have shown how shy children were able to break free and socialize with more confidence once they switched to contact lenses.

Also, many kids have a habit of taking their glasses on and off, forgetting them in random places. Contact lenses cannot be misplaced as easily!

What’s the most important thing to tell kids who want to wear contact lenses?

When kids visit our optometry practices in Lewis Center, Westerville, Johnstown, and , Ohio, to ask about getting contacts, we make sure to tell them about the risks of being negligent. When contact lenses aren’t cared for properly, they can lead to serious infections that may damage vision. At Professional VisionCare, we’ll take the time to instruct your child on the best ways to handle, disinfect, and store their new contact lenses!

At Professional VisionCare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 614-898-9989 or book an appointment online to see one of our Lewis Center eye doctors.

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Does My Child Need Vision Therapy?

Signs that indicate your child may need kids eye care with vision therapy

Vision therapy is a non-surgical treatment based on the use of eye exercises, customized optometric devices, and techniques to enhance vision. This type of kids eye care can address and cure many common vision problems that cannot be resolved sufficiently with standard prescription eyeglasses or contact lenses. Without vision therapy, these problems can lead to learning difficulties – including trouble with basic reading and writing.

At Professional VisionCare, we offer custom-designed vision therapy near you, in our conveniently located eye care clinics in Lewis Center, Westerville, Johnstown, and , Ohio.

Signs that your child may need vision therapy

The need for vision therapy isn’t always clear, because changes can occur gradually and your kid doesn’t know his or her eyes should work differently. Often, only a qualified vision therapy professional will detect certain problems. Yet, while diagnosis can be tricky, there are a number of warning signs for parents to watch out for, including:

  • Holding books and reading material very close to the face
  • General avoidance of any tasks done up close
  • Headaches
  • Rubbing eyes frequently
  • Squinting or closing one eye; tilting head to one side
  • Skipping lines while reading
  • Taking an abnormally long time to do homework
  • Poor reading comprehension
  • Reverses letters when reading, such as b’s and d’s
  • Short attention span when it comes to reading and schoolwork
  • Trouble with focusing
  • Difficulty with visual tracking and eye mobility
  • Abnormal mood swings (often due to frustration)

If your child exhibits any of these symptoms, it’s essential to schedule a consultation with a kids eye care specialist near you as soon as possible. By starting vision therapy early, many vision-related problems with learning, socializing, and playing sports can be prevented – so your child doesn’t need to struggle.

Conditions treated by vision therapy

The most common problems that our eye doctors in Lewis Center, Westerville, Johnstown, and , Ohio, treat with vision therapy include:

  • Amblyopia (“lazy eye”)
  • Strabismus (irregular eye alignment)
  • Crossed eyes
  • Convergence insufficiency
  • Double vision
  • Reading and learning difficulties

The vast majority of children with these conditions can be helped by following a program of optometric vision therapy. We will custom-design in-office treatments and daily exercise sessions to be done at home.


Good vision is a cornerstone to learning and to success in life. As a parent, you can help make that happen by scheduling regular eye exams for your child with a kids eye care specialist near you.

At Professional VisionCare, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 614-898-9989 or book an appointment online to see one of our Lewis Center eye doctors.

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